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It’s time to check your moles

Have you checked your moles lately? Let this be your reminder!

Melasma is a relatively common skin condition, characterised by patchy, tan to grey-brown facial discolourations. Melasma is more prevalent among those of Hispanic, Asian, Middle Eastern and African origin, and those taking oral and topical contraceptives. Melasma should not be confused with Melanoma, also known as malignant melanoma, is a type of cancer that develops from the pigment-containing cells known as melanocytes. Melanomas typically occur in the skin, but may rarely occur in the mouth, intestines, or eye. In women, they most commonly occur on the legs, while in men they are most common on the back. Diagnosis is by biopsy and analysis of any skin lesion that has signs of being potentially cancerous. Using sunscreen and avoiding UV light may prevent melanoma.

Remember the ABCDE for Melanoma

  • A is for Asymmetry. Most melanomas are asymmetrical. If you draw a line through the middle of the lesion, the two halves don’t match, so it looks different from a round to oval and symmetrical common mole.
  • B is for Border. Melanoma borders tend to be uneven and may have scalloped or notched edges, while common moles tend to have smoother, more even borders.
  • C is for Colour. Multiple colours are a warning sign. While benign moles are usually a single shade of brown, a melanoma may have different shades of brown, tan or black. As it grows, the colours red, white or blue may also appear.
  • D is for Diameter or Dark. While it’s ideal to detect a melanoma when it is small, it’s a warning sign if a lesion is the size of a pencil eraser (about 6 mm, or ¼ inch in diameter) or larger. Some experts say it is also important to look for any lesion, no matter what size, that is darker than others. Rare, amelanotic melanomas are colourless.
  • E is for Evolving. Any change in size, shape, colour or elevation of a spot on your skin, or any new symptom in it, such as bleeding, itching or crusting, may be a warning sign of melanoma.

If you notice these warning signs, or anything NEW, CHANGING or UNUSUAL on your skin see a dermatologist promptly.

 

The bottom line, KNOW the risks, UNDERSTAND the causes & STAY on top of your SPF!

For more information on the topics mentioned in this blog or to speak to a member of our team, click here and we’ll be in touch


By HC MedSpa
26th August 2021

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